Power Generation Integrated in Burners for Industrial/ Commercial Packaged Boilers
Final Project Report

Cover of report

Publication Number: CEC-500-2013-133
Report Date: December 2008


Power Generation Integrated in Burners for Industrial/ Commercial Packaged Boilers - Final Project Report.
(PDF file, 90 pages, 2.3 mb).


Appendices
 

Abstract

Conventional microturbine-based combined heat and power systems consist principally of a recuperated microturbine coupled with a hot water heat exchanger. Their applications are mostly limited to commercial sites where hot water can be utilized. Overall combined heat and power efficiency is about 70 percent. A simple-cycle microturbine integrated with an industrial packaged boiler where the high quality steam production is the primary method for microturbine waste heat recovery has the potential for over 80 percent combined heat and power efficiency while providing added economic and operational benefits to industrial boiler owners. But they must comply with the California Air Resources Board 2007 distributed generation emission requirements as well as meet local air permit levels.

The purpose of this project was to develop and demonstrate a novel combined heat and power package that integrated a simple-cycle 80 kilowatt electrical microturbine with a gas-fired ultra-low nitrogen oxide burner boiler. The package was designed to: (1) achieve maximum overall electrical and thermal efficiency; (2) meet California Air Resources Board 2007 distributed generation emission requirements; (3) meet local air permit limits for industrial boilers; (4) reduce the carbon footprint; and (5) minimize the cost of small-scale combined heat and power systems to promote the adoption of microturbine-based combined heat and power in industrial and commercial plants. The combined heat and power technology achieved all its technical objectives and was successfully demonstrated for the first time on an industrial boiler. The microturbine achieved nitrogen oxides significantly below the California Air Resource Board 2007 distributed generation emission limits with about 82.7 percent combined heat and power efficiency. Overall nitrogen oxide emissions from the boiler were reduced by more than 50 percent. Carbon dioxide reduction was 0.17 to 0.27 tons per megawatt hour relative to central power stations, helping to mitigate global climate change impacts.