For Immediate Release: December 12, 2012
Media Contact: Kelly M. Kell - 916-654-4989

MEDIA ADVISORY

Energy Commission Awards $12 Million in Energy Loans
to California Cities, School District
Efficiency upgrades include street lighting, HVAC, and solar installations


SACRAMENTO - The California Energy Commission today awarded more than $12 million to improve the energy efficiency of eight California communities. The funds come from the Commission's Energy Conservation Assistance Act (ECAA) program.

"For more than 30 years, the ECCA low interest loans have helped local communities and school districts invest in simple, effective ways to cut energy use and save money," said Energy Commission Chair Robert B. Weisenmiller. "Today's recipients join a list of more than 770 energy efficient projects that have paid for themselves by immediately lowering electricity bills. These eight projects alone will result in annual energy savings of more than $1 million."

The eight projects include the retrofitting of streetlights and heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) units, as well as the installation of solar photovoltaic systems. Combined, the projects are expected to save 8,056,471 kilowatt hours or $1,093,718 in energy costs, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 2,772 tons.

The projects include:

  • Monterey Peninsula Unified School District received a $2.7 million loan to install a total of 797 kilowatts of solar PV at four area schools. The solar PV systems are estimated to produce a total of 1.1 million kilowatt hours annually resulting in annual cost savings of $221,885.
  • The city of San Diego received $2 million to retrofit more than 2,000 high pressure sodium streetlights to Light Emitting Diodes (LED). The city is expected to reduce energy consumption by 1.5 million kilowatt hours or $182,200 in energy costs annually and lower C02 emissions by 530 tons.
  • The city of San Marcos (San Diego County) was awarded a loan of $602,000 to retrofit various HVAC systems in city-owned buildings. The project is expected to save the city $79,300 in energy costs savings, reduce electricity usage by 508,700 kilowatt hours, and lower greenhouse gas emissions by 175 tons annually.
  • The city of Richmond (Contra Costa County) received $1.5 million to retrofit more than 2,500 high pressure sodium and mercury vapor streetlights with LED streetlights. The project is estimated to save the city $119,900 in energy costs, reduce electricity usage by 942,800 kilowatt hours, and save 325 tons of greenhouse gas emissions annually.
  • The city of San Luis Obispo was awarded 1.2 million to install more than 2,200 LED streetlights. The LEDs will replace older, less-efficient high pressure sodium and mercury vapor streetlights. The city will save approximately $99,000 in energy costs savings, 778,700 kilowatt hours and 268 tons of greenhouse gas emissions annually.
  • The city of Santa Maria (Santa Barbara County) was awarded a loan of $2 million to retrofit more than 5,000 low and high pressure sodium streetlights to LED. The project is estimated to save $188,200 in energy costs, reduce electricity consumption by 1.5 million kilowatt hours, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 530 tons annually.
  • The city of Rancho Cordova (Sacramento County) received $1.8 million to switch out 4,700 high pressure and mercury vapor streetlights to LED. Rancho Cordova is expecting annual savings of $156,000 in energy costs, 2.3 million kilowatt hours in energy usage, and 824 tons in greenhouse gas emissions.
  • The city of Los Angeles received $426,500 to retrofit interior lighting and controls at various city-owned buildings. The project is estimated to save the city $46,997 in energy costs, reduce electricity consumption by 347,000 kilowatt hours, and reduce CO2 emissions by 120 tons annually.

The combined $12,396,666 in energy loans for these projects are granted at a one percent interest rate for local governments, public K-12 schools, special districts, and public and non-profit hospitals and care facilities.



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As of December 2012, nearly $280 million in ECAA loans to local governments, public K-12 schools and hospitals, public care institutions and other agencies have been allocated to more than 770 recipients. For more information on the ECAA loan program, visit: http://www.energy.ca.gov/efficiency/financing/.

The California Energy Commission is the state's primary energy policy and planning agency. Created by the Legislature in 1974 and located in Sacramento, six basic responsibilities guide the Energy Commission as it sets state energy policy: forecasting future energy needs; licensing thermal power plants 50 megawatts or larger; promoting energy efficiency and conservation by setting the state's appliance and building efficiency standards; supporting public interest energy research that advances energy science and technology through research, development, and demonstration programs; developing renewable energy resources and alternative renewable energy technologies for buildings, industry and transportation; planning for and directing state response to energy emergencies