Medium- and heavy-duty vehicles have a gross vehicle weight rating of more than 10,000 pounds and include vans, buses, and trucks. This dataset is updated annually in April to reflect the number of DMV-registered vehicles “on the road” during the previous calendar year. Visit full page layout of dashboard, download data, or return to dashboard collection page.

Other Dashboards in this Collection:
New ZEV Sales | Light-Duty Vehicle Population | Medium- & Heavy-Duty Vehicle Population | EV Chargers | Hydrogen Stations  | School Buses | School Bus Chargers

Definition of Terms

Weight Class: The Federal Highway Administration classifies vehicles by their gross vehicle weight rating (GVWR). GVWR is the vehicle manufacturer’s specification of the vehicle’s loaded weight. Vehicle weight class ranges from 1 through 8. See below for more information on vehicle weight class.

GVWR: Gross vehicle weight rating – the maximum operating weight of the vehicle set by the manufacturer. This includes the empty vehicle weight, fuel, passengers, and cargo combined.

Light-Duty: Vehicles with a GVWR under 10,000 pounds. Includes weight classes 1 and 2.

Medium-Duty: Vehicles with a GVWR between 10,001 – 26,000 pounds. Includes weight classes 3, 4, 5, and 6.

Heavy-Duty: Vehicles with a GVWR greater than 26,000 pounds. Includes weight classes 7 and 8.

Light-Duty Weight Class


Weight class 1 vehicles have a gross vehicle weight rating of less than 6,000 pounds.
Example Models: Toyota Tacoma, Ford Transit Connect, and Chrysler Pacifica.

Class 1 vehicles are light-duty vehicles. Examples include small cargo vans, compact pickups, sport utility vehicles, and minivans.

Weight class 2 vehicles have a gross vehicle weight rating between 6,001 pounds to 10,000 pounds.
Example Models: Ford F-150 Lightning, Rivian R1T, Ford E-Transit-350 Cargo, and Mercedes-Benz eSprinter.

Class 2 vehicles are light-duty vehicles. Examples include panel vans, standard size pickups, large sport utility vehicles, and large passenger vans.

Medium-Duty Weight Class


Weight class 3 vehicles have a gross vehicle weight rating between 10,001 pounds to 14,000 pounds.
Example Models: GMC Hummer EV, Navistar eStar, Workhorse C-Series Vehicles, and Chevy Silverado 3500 HD.

Class 3 vehicles are medium-duty vehicles. Examples include large panel vans, heavy-duty pickup trucks, and straight trucks.

Weight class 4 vehicles have a gross vehicle weight rating between 14,001 pounds to 16,000 pounds.
Example Models: Cenntro City Porter and Ford F-450 Super Duty.

Class 4 vehicles are medium-duty vehicles. Examples include step vans, small dump trucks, and large straight trucks.

Weight class 5 vehicles have a gross vehicle weight rating between 16,001 pounds to 19,500 pounds.
Example Models: Chanje V8100 and Ford F-550.

Class 5 vehicles are medium-duty vehicles. Examples include step vans, large maintenance trucks, and large straight trucks.

Weight class 6 vehicles have a gross vehicle weight rating between 19,501 pounds to 26,000 pounds.
Example Models: BYD 6D Step Van, Xos SV, and U-Haul 26’ Truck.

Class 6 vehicles are medium-duty vehicles. Examples include large step vans, medium school buses, and large straight trucks.

Heavy-Duty Weight Class


Weight class 7 vehicles have a gross vehicle weight rating between 26,001 pounds to 33,000 pounds.
Example Models: Freightliner eM2 108/106 and Blue Bird All American/All Canadian School Bus.

Class 7 vehicles are heavy-duty vehicles. Examples include school buses, transit buses, large straight trucks, and drayage tractors.

Weight class 8 vehicles have a gross vehicle weight rating of 33,001 pounds and greater.
Example Models: Volvo VNR Electric Tractor, Xos ET-One, New Flyer Xcelsior, and Proterra Catalyst.

Class 8 vehicles are heavy-duty vehicles. Examples include coach buses, large transit buses, large straight trucks, drayage tractors, and refuse/recycling trucks.

Information
The dataset contains DMV-registered medium- and heavy-duty vehicles licensed for operation on California roads. However, it does not necessarily include vehicles that operate off of California roads. For example, some medium- and heavy-duty ZEVs may operate only within a port facility and not be registered, while other vehicles of the same make and model may be licensed with the DMV for operation on roads because they occasionally do so. In addition, the data does not include direct electric trolleybuses, which draw power directly from overhead wires. This dashboard is a continually evolving effort solely using DMV registration data, so there may also be some data gaps with actual ZEVs operating in the state (e.g., pilot projects, extremely low-volume conversions, off-road operations, etc.).

Data as of: June 30, 2022

Dashboard Last Updated: July 26, 2022

Citing
Please cite use of these data and images. California Energy Commission (2022). Medium- and Heavy-Duty Zero-Emission Vehicles in California. Data last updated [insert date last updated]. Retrieved [insert date retrieved] from https://www.energy.ca.gov/zevstats

Contact
Please submit questions and comments to mediaoffice@energy.ca.gov.